Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GOOSE

What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander: take that in your thought too.

Apples in some form or other are commonly served with goose.

Cyrus, my advice to you is to go home and tell your wife not to be a goose.

The old soldiers, for some inscrutable reason, go for goose to a man.

I told Mallet if he would cook a goose, I would tip one over.

He then bade me carry the goose into the ranks, and to come to him when we halted at night.

Send apple-sauce to table with the goose; also mashed potatoes.

This gravy is by many preferred to that which comes from the goose in roasting.

If a goose is old it is useless to cook it, as when hard and tough it cannot be eaten.

An' he's got no more business sense into him than God give a goose.

WORD ORIGIN

"a large waterfowl proverbially noted, I know not why, for foolishness" [Johnson], Old English gos, from Proto-Germanic *gans- "goose" (cf. Old Frisian gos, Old Norse gas, Old High German gans, German Gans "goose"), from PIE *ghans- (cf. Sanskrit hamsah (masc.), hansi (fem.), "goose, swan;" Greek khen; Latin anser; Polish gęś "goose;" Lithuanian zasis "goose;" Old Irish geiss "swan"), probably imitative of its honking.

Spanish ganso "goose" is from a Germanic source. Loss of "n" sound is normal before "s." Plural form geese is an example of i-mutation.

Meaning "simpleton" is from 1540s. To cook one's goose first attested 1845, of unknown origin; attempts to connect it to Swedish history and Greek fables have been unconvincing. Goose egg "zero" first attested 1866 in baseball slang. The goose that laid the golden egg is from Aesop.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GOOSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.