Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR KICK

So saying, he thrust his boot into the snow, intending to kick it over the girl.

"I think you oughter make a kick, sir," said Dixon, hesitatingly.

She could scratch, kick, and bite—and stab too; but for stabbing she wanted a knife.

Not at all, plase your honour—I say it was well but I got a kick of the baast.

Stop that barkin', now, you whelp, Or I'll kick you till you yelp!

If 'twere not for some twinges of the gout, I'd kick you out!

Again, and this time with purpose, did Grey Beaver kick him.

I know well enough my mare did not kick you before you struck her.

It is undoubtedly tremendous, but nothing to kick up such a row about.

He tried to kick himself aside, but the pull of the liquid was too powerful for him.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "to strike out with the foot" (earliest in biblical phrase now usually rendered as kick against the pricks), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old Norse kikna "bend backwards, sink at the knees." "The doubts OED has about the Scandinavian origin of kick are probably unfounded" [Liberman]. Related: Kicked; kicking.

Figurative sense of "complain, protest, rebel against" (late 14c.) probably is from the Bible verse. Slang sense of "die" is attested from 1725 (kick the wind was slang for "be hanged," 1590s; see also bucket). Meaning "to end one's drug habit" is from 1936. Kick in "contribute" is from 1908; kick out "expel" is from 1690s. To kick oneself in self-reproach is from 1891. The children's game of kick the can is attested from 1891.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR KICK

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.