Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR START

I can tell by the way you start out—just like your pa fur all the world.

But before you start to read let me explain what I intend to do.

Filled the water-cans, and got everything ready for a start to-morrow morning.

On the 23rd we were engaged making preparations for a start for Eucla.

All busy preparing for a start for the Head of the Bight to-morrow.

Then they wait for a third service, and after that start out home again.

Start on this journey of progress and justice, and America will walk at your side.

To disregard it would be to start the suspicions of Dozier as soon as his brain cleared.

He was determined to start a grocery, and start a grocery he would and did.

Is it not delightful to know that you can start anything when you please?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English *steortian, *stiertan, Kentish variants of styrtan "to leap up" (related to starian "to stare"), from Proto-Germanic *sturtjan- (cf. Old Frisian stirta "to fall, tumble," Middle Dutch sterten, Dutch storten "to rush, fall," Old High German sturzen, German stürzen "to hurl, throw, plunge"), of unknown origin.

From "move or spring suddenly," sense evolved by late 14c. to "awaken suddenly, flinch or recoil in alarm," and 1660s to "cause to begin acting or operating." Meaning "begin to move, leave, depart" is from 1821. The connection is probably from sporting senses ("to force an animal from its lair," late 14c.).

Related: Started; starting. To start something "cause trouble" is 1917, American English colloquial. Starting block first recorded 1937.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR START

alpha

nounbeginning
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.