Synonyms for stem

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Antonyms for stem

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STEM

Let us rejoice that one such partisan was now at hand to stem the torrent of abuse.

There is one stream which I dread my inability to stem—it is the tide of Popular Opinion.

In his excitement the dominie had snapped the stem of his tobacco pipe in two.

Then one after the other the two tenders puffed away, packed from stem to stern.

And the pick was only the stem of a kau-ling plant, to which a bit of brick had been fastened.

Again, take the stem of the chief tree in Claude's Narcissus.

There are three things we've forgotten, the stem, stern-post, and keel.

It was an eggcup, and its stem had been mended with plaster.

The gills are rounded next the stem, and quite remote from it.

The gills are somewhat narrower toward the stem than they are in the middle.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stemn, stefn "stem of a plant," also "either end-post of a ship," from Proto-Germanic *stamniz (cf. Old Saxon stamm, Old Norse stafn "stem of a ship;" Danish stamme, Swedish stam "trunk of a tree;" Old High German stam, German Stamm), from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet).

Meaning "support of a wineglass" is from 1835. Stem-winding watches (1875) were advanced and desirable when introduced, hence slang stem-winder "excellent thing" (1892). The nautical sense is preserved in the phrase stem to stern "along the full length" (of a ship), attested from 1620s. The verbal phrase stems from, first recorded 1932, American English, translates German stammen aus, probably from a figurative sense represented by English stem (n.) in the sense of "stock of a family, line of descent" (c.1540; cf. family tree, and German stammvater "tribal ancestor," literally "stem-father"). Stem cell attested by 1885.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STEM

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.