Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRAVELY

"You want to cut out worrying about me," he counseled, bravely.

"We'll break the bad luck seven to-day," asserted little Redpath, bravely.

"I'll see it in London," she had said bravely, trying to conceal her disappointment.

Then she fell to thinking how bravely he had borne him in that fray.

Go now, and bear you bravely, as you will for your own honour and that of England, and for mine.

She had bravely striven to keep her fairyhood, and in the battle of wits, had lost.

Never mind, Tom; bear on bravely, lad, and you'll outlive vexation.

But who could that saucy knave be who answered me to my beard so bravely?

We went about two kilometres as bravely as possible, and then I stopped, quite exhausted.

Sometimes he would have a dozen or more to eat, but he did it bravely—from a sense of duty.

WORD ORIGIN

late 15c., from Middle French brave, "splendid, valiant," from Italian bravo "brave, bold," originally "wild, savage," possibly from Medieval Latin bravus "cutthroat, villain," from Latin pravus "crooked, depraved;" a less likely etymology being from Latin barbarus (see barbarous). A Celtic origin (Irish breagh, Cornish bray) also has been suggested.

Old English words for this, some with overtones of "rashness," included modig (now "moody"), beald ("bold"), cene ("keen"), dyrstig ("daring"). Brave new world is from the title of Aldous Huxley's 1932 satirical utopian novel; he lifted the phrase from Shakespeare ("Tempest" v.i.183).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BRAVELY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.