Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RELEASE

Until that ecstasy of release should come, he would do his duty,—yes, his duty.

Release can come only when the race at large is willing to cast the evil thing off.

Now I am advised by others to try on my release to forget that I have ever been in a prison at all.

It was as if some mighty pent force were struggling for release.

There was no joy over her release in his tones, nor pity for her condition.

He was made a delegate of the Red Committee less than a year after his release on licence.

Did he not release Joseph from the pit, and raise him to princely glory?

At least, release my gentle sister, and pour out all your malice on me.

We were at Luxor; and somewhere not far off, Mabella Hnem was praying for release.

The audience sank back with a gasp of release from the strain of attention.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "to withdraw, revoke (a decree, etc.), cancel, lift; remit," from Old French relaissier, relesser "to relinquish, quit, let go, leave behind, abandon, acquit," variant of relacher "release, relax," from Latin relaxare "loosen, stretch out" (see relax). Cf. Spanish relajar, Italian relassare.

Meaning "alleviate, ease" is mid-14c., as is sense of "free from (duty, etc.); exonerate." From late 14c. as "grant remission, forgive; set free from imprisonment, military service, etc." Also "give up, relinquish, surrender." In law, c.1400, "to grant a release of property." Of press reports, attested from 1904; of motion pictures, from 1912; of music recordings, from 1962. As a euphemism for "to dismiss, fire from a job" it is attested in American English since 1904. Related: Released; releasing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RELEASE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.