incriminate

[ in-krim-uh-neyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF incriminate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INCRIMINATE

How, then, is it lawful to incriminate the Principate of the whole Church?

A prisoner is no longer a man, but a human agent to incriminate others.

Even if it were, there was nothing in it to incriminate her.

We've searched these grounds, and found nothing to incriminate anybody.

You will find much to incriminate society and precious little that will incriminate me.

We rely on your honour not to incriminate us with the police.

I took care, in answer to Flora's challenge, not to incriminate Mrs. Meldrum.

Take some of your friends with you—sh—don't ask me why—I might incriminate myself!

Do you refuse to answer on the ground that you might incriminate yourself?

"Because Wade tells me no man can be forced to incriminate himself," he replied.

WORD ORIGIN

1730, back-formation from incrimination or else from Medieval Latin incriminatus, past participle of incriminare "to incriminate," from in- "in" (see in- (2)) + criminare "to accuse of a crime," from crimen (genitive criminis) "crime" (see crime). Related: Incriminated; incriminating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INCRIMINATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.