Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LATE

Since he went to Salamis in search of you, I have not seen him until late this evening.

Have you not of late struggled against the warnings of this friendly spirit?

They walked rapidly to the station, but too late, of course, for the train.

It was a very good season, but the expedition was too late in starting.

Made rather a late start, owing to some of the horses straying.

I think it would be a greater tragedy if she has come too late.

It was late in August, and on the first of September Emilia was to be married.

Destructive wars ensued, which have of late only been terminated.

Of late she had been more intimate than ever with Althea Parker.

It is rather too late in the day for you to see the registrar.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English læt "occurring after the customary or expected time," originally "slow, sluggish," from Proto-Germanic *lata- (cf. Old Norse latr "sluggish, lazy," Middle Dutch, Old Saxon lat, German laß "idle, weary," Gothic lats "weary, sluggish, lazy," latjan "to hinder"), from PIE *led- "slow, weary" (cf. Latin lassus "faint, weary, languid, exhausted," Greek ledein "to be weary"), from root *le- "to let go, slacken" (see let (v.)).

The sense of "deceased" (as in the late Mrs. Smith) is from late 15c., from an adverbial sense of "recently." Of women's menstrual periods, attested colloquially from 1962. Related: Lateness. As an adverb, from Old English late.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.