synonyms
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dead

[ ded ]SEE DEFINITION OF dead

Synonyms for dead

  • asleep
  • buried
  • deceased
  • late
  • lifeless
  • cold
  • departed
  • stiff
  • bereft of life
  • bloodless
  • bought the farm
  • breathless
  • cadaverous
  • checked out
  • cut off
  • defunct
  • done for
  • erased
  • expired
  • extinct
  • gone
  • gone to meet maker
  • gone to reward
  • inanimate
  • inert
  • liquidated
  • mortified
  • no more
  • not existing
  • offed
  • out of one's misery
  • passed away
  • perished
  • pushing up daisies
  • reposing
  • resting in peace
  • spiritless
  • unanimated
  • wasted
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Antonyms for dead

  • alive
  • lively
  • living
  • active
  • animate
  • animated
  • being
  • continuing
  • enduring
  • existent
  • existing
  • incomplete
  • interested
  • live
  • operative
  • responsive
  • spirited
  • subsisting
  • unfinished
  • warm
  • working
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEAD

Afterward, I looked downward, and saw my dead body lying on a couch.

The face of the maid that served him had been no heaven for the souls of dead flowers.

Was his father still alive, or was this letter a communication from the dead?

His eyes were closed, his face a dead, chalky white, and his body hung limp.

It seemed like one risen from the dead, for he supposed him lying at the bottom of the sea.

Had the dead come back from the bottom of the sea to expose him?

What was to become of the slaves on this plantation now that the master was dead?

Whacked his head on a rock, and young Lanning thought his man was dead.

It's sad—sad to go through so much pain and then to have a dead baby.

The man was stretched on the pavement brutishly drunk and dead to the world.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English dead "dead," also "torpid, dull;" of water, "still, standing," from Proto-Germanic *dauthaz (cf. Old Saxon dod, Danish død, Swedish död, Old Frisian dad, Middle Dutch doot, Dutch dood, Old High German tot, German tot, Old Norse dauðr, Gothic dauþs "dead"), from PIE *dhou-toz-, from root *dheu- (3) "to die" (see die (v.)).

Meaning "insensible" is first attested early 13c. Of places, "inactive, dull," from 1580s. Used from 16c. in adjectival sense of "utter, absolute, quite" (cf. dead drunk first attested 1590s; dead heat, 1796). As an adverb, from late 14c. Dead on is 1889, from marksmanship. Dead duck is from 1844. Dead letter is from 1703, used of laws lacking force as well as uncollected mail. Phrase in the dead of the night first recorded 1540s.

Dead soldier "emptied liquor bottle" is from 1913 in that form; the image is older:

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEAD

boring

adjectiveuninteresting

casualties

nounvictim
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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