Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OUT

I saw 'em fur years, with a big cuttin' out to show the cross-section.

Then it's better to take him out back of the barn and shoot him, by Gad!

And the wild ducklings are out on the pool, and the woods are full of song.

Still he reflected that he would be unable to get out, and in the morning he could go for the constable.

Then I shall have to put it out of your power to carry out your threat.

You will probably see me out again in a few days, if you take the trouble to look.

Might it not be well to ease up a little after he's out there?

He said he was out hunting with a friend, and his friend's gun went off accidentally.

In the end, then, you'll be out a lot of money even if you win.

Henry is now working ten hours a day out to the packinghouse.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English ut "out, without, outside," common Germanic (cf. Old Norse, Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Gothic ut, Middle Dutch uut, Dutch uit, Old High German uz, German aus), from PIE root *ud- "up, out, up away" (cf. Sanskrit ut "up, out," uttarah "higher, upper, later, northern;" Avestan uz- "up, out," Old Irish ud- "out," Latin usque "all the way to, without interruption," Greek hysteros "the latter," Russian vy- "out"). Meaning "into public notice" is from 1540s. As an adjective from c.1200. Meaning "unconscious" is attested from 1898, originally in boxing. Sense of "not popular or modern" is from 1966. As a preposition from mid-13c.

Sense in baseball (1860) was earlier in cricket (1746). Adverbial phrase out-and-out "thoroughly" is attested from early 14c.; adjective usage is attested from 1813; out-of-the-way (adj.) "remote, secluded" is attested from late 15c. Out-of-towner "one not from a certain place" is from 1911. Shakespeare's It out-herods Herod ("Hamlet") reflects Herod as stock braggart and bully in old religious drama and was widely imitated 19c. Out to lunch "insane" is student slang from 1955; out of this world "excellent" is from 1938; out of sight "excellent, superior" is from 1891.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OUT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.