Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HERE

Here he had prestige because he was the son of Daniel Bines, organiser and man of affairs.

No, Bines; they'll be here presently, and you can meet them, anyway.

"Here's a fine letter to read on a hot day," called Percival.

Here we see but a few of the last links, and those imperfectly.

Here the tumult of mingled emotion subsided in a flood of tears.

I fly to seek a kindlier sphere, Since thou hast ceased to love me here.

This here fellow, now, couldn't make an honest livin' like that, I bet you.

Not of age—merely of time; for here was no senility, no quavering or fretful lines.

Why, this here despatch is signed by young Toler—that's his confidential man.

Here, perchance, may be found a clue in symbol to the family strife.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English her "in this place, where one puts himself," from Proto-Germanic pronomial stem *hi- (from PIE *ki- "this;" see he) + adverbial suffix -r. Cognate with Old Saxon her, Old Norse, Gothic her, Swedish här, Middle Dutch, Dutch hier, Old High German hiar, German hier.

Phrase here today and gone tomorrow first recorded 1680s in writings of Aphra Behn. Here's to _____ as a toast is from 1590s, probably short for here's health to _____. In vulgar speech, this here as an adjective is attested from 1762. To be neither here nor there "of no consequence" attested from 1580s. Here we go again as a sort of verbal roll of the eyes is attested from 1950. Noun phrase here and now "this present life" is from 1829.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HERE

hither

adverbto this place
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.