Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FRESHEST

It was a breezy June afternoon, with the young summer at its freshest and lustiest.

It was the freshest and cleanest world he had ever seen and she was one with it.

On the contrary, even the freshest faces wore an expression of austerity.

The toilets were the freshest and the manners most well-bred in Paris.

There were cheeses too, and pots of cream—one and all of the best and freshest.

Molly and her mother followed their noses to the freshest pyramid.

Frank deserves the simplest and freshest confidence from me.

Two of the freshest of the drove were left behind, for Don Estevan and the Senator.

I mean the freshest of them, that went over the ford of the stream.

She is out riding in her strongest, freshest steed, the White Wind.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c. "unsalted, pure, sweet, eager," metathesis of Old English fersc "unsalted," from West Germanic *friskaz (cf. Old Frisian fersk, Middle Dutch versch, Dutch vers, Old High German frisc, German frisch "fresh").

Probably cognate with Old Church Slavonic presinu "fresh," Lithuanian preskas "sweet." The metathesis, and the expanded Middle English senses of "new, pure, eager" are probably by influence of (or in some instances, from) Old French fres (fem. fresche), from Proto-Germanic *frisko-, and thus related to the English word. The Germanic root also is the source of Italian and Spanish fresco. Related: Freshly; freshness.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.