1. Does Punctuation Go Inside Or Outside Of Quotation Marks?

    Does Punctuation Go Inside Or Outside Of Quotation Marks?

    Quotation marks are common in writing, but it can be tricky to learn how to punctuate them correctly. If you’ve ever been writing a quote and found yourself wondering if that exclamation point should go inside the quotation marks or outside of them, you definitely aren’t alone. Here’s a quick guide to using punctuation with quotation marks like a pro, and you can quote us …

  2. 5 Grammar Rules You Don’t Actually Need To Follow

    5 Grammar Rules You Don’t Actually Need To Follow

    We’re going to go out on a limb and guess that your online writing and casual conversations don’t follow every single grammar rule. (In fact, do your text messages or Instagram comments follow any rules at all?) And that’s OK, because the way you speak with your friends or communicate online is not meant to sound quite as formal as, say, an essay or published …

  3. Is It “New Years” or “New Year’s”?

    Is It “New Years” or “New Year’s”?

    As if the words to “Auld Lang Syne” weren’t difficult enough to remember, ringing in a brand-new year comes with some particularly befuddling grammar landmines. Of course, the punctuation we use when talking about the New Year’s holiday couldn’t do us a solid and follow the same pattern as Veterans Day (note the lack of apostrophe), because … well, that’s the English language for you. Don’t …

  4. “Snuck” vs. “Sneaked”: Which One Is Correct?

    “Snuck” vs. “Sneaked”: Which One Is Correct?

    Sneak is one tricky word—sneaky, you might say. It started out as a regular verb. You know the type: adhering to the rules, using regular verb endings … but then took a detour (in the last 100 years or so) into irregular verb territory. It’s odd to say the least. But what does this all mean? Is the verb sneaked correct? Like leaked as the past tense …

  5. Is It Tis The Season Or ‘Tis The Season?

    Is It Tis The Season Or ‘Tis The Season?

    What does ‘tis mean? ‘Tis, as in “`tis the season” is an old—very old—contraction of it is. The apostrophe replaces the i in the word it to create ’tis … not quite how we create contractions today. According to Google’s Ngram Viewer, the contraction ’tis was a fan favorite in the early 1700s. At this time, it was likely used more often than it’s. Why is ’tis used? ‘Tis is also known …

  6. How To Write Plural Last Names

    How To Write Plural Last Names

    If writing out your holiday cards or ordering a sign for the front of your house makes you break out in hives, you may know a few grammar sticklers who like to poke fun. You know the type: the people who own stock in red ink manufacturing and are quick to point out when you’ve misused that apostrophe and inappropriately pluralized your last name. But …

  7. Which Is Correct: Veterans Day Or Veteran’s Day?

    Which Is Correct: Veterans Day Or Veteran’s Day?

    What do apostrophes have to do with this federal holiday? Well, there’s a confusing apostrophe in Veterans’ Day—or is there? Does Veterans Day have an apostrophe? Veterans Day is often incorrectly written as “Veteran’s Day” or “Veterans’ Day.” But, in fact, it’s apostrophe free. “Veteran’s Day” would definitely be incorrect because it would mean a day for only one veteran. While “Veterans’ Day” does encompass …

  8. Does Traditional Grammar Matter When It Comes To Singular “They” And “Themself”?

    Does Traditional Grammar Matter When It Comes To Singular “They” And “Themself”?

    Has someone ever asked you to refer to them as they instead of he or she? Or, are you hedging because you can’t possibly refer to one single person as they? Well, what if we told you that they has been used to refer to just one person since at least the 1300s? And what if we also told you themself is perfectly acceptable—and in many …

  9. What Is The Difference Between “Judgement” And “Judgment”?

    What Is The Difference Between “Judgement” And “Judgment”?

    Have you ever seen the word judgment spelled two different ways? Sometimes, it appears as we spelled it here (no e), and other times it appears with an e: judgement. Which one is correct? Is judgment spelled with an e? Well, the short answer is that judgment is the prevailing (“dominant”) spelling. Judgment is a noun that has several meanings, including “the act or instance of judging,” and “the …

  10. “Have” vs. “Has”: When To Use Each One

    “Have” vs. “Has”: When To Use Each One

    Have and has are different forms of the verb to have. Even though they come from the same word, there are slight differences in the way they’re used. While the verb to have has many different meanings, its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.” Have and has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used …