Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ONCE

The faithful attendants at once suspected treachery in Alcibiades.

Take it at once, and tell her I shall be up to see her presently.

Once it was that he had felt a sudden great longing for the life of a gay city.

For his sake, I am glad once more to be in my own happy home.

"Oh, I see," said the younger Milbrey—his face clearing all at once.

I have more than once tried to deceive you, but you will feel that I am not now speaking falsely.

When I hear a note of music, can I not at once strike its chord?

"I'll put on the teakettle at once, Robert," said his mother, rising.

Well, if you have any business, you may state it at once, as I am quite busy.

I have met a Mlle. Bines to whom I shall at once pay my addresses.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, anes, from ane "one" (see one ) + adverbial genitive. Replaced Old English æne. Spelling changed as pronunciation shifted from two syllables to one after c.1300. Pronunciation change to "wuns" parallels that of one. As an emphatic, meaning "once and for all," it is attested from c.1300, but this now is regarded as a Pennsylvania German dialect formation. Meaning "in a past time" (but not necessarily just one time) is from mid-13c.

Once upon a time as the beginning of a story is recorded from 1590s. At once originally (early 13c.) meant "simultaneously," later "in one company" (c.1300), and preserved the sense of "one" in the word; the phrase typically appeared as one word, atones; the modern meaning "immediately" is attested from 1530s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ONCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.