Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EASE

"He said he was poor," urged Billy, who had been rather taken with the ease of Arledge's manner.

Might it not be well to ease up a little after he's out there?

The gentlemen were smoking, and some of the ladies were trying to look at ease with cigarettes.

But, if it be to ease her heart, and not to dispute my will, you may hear her out.

And for them—and so for us—this is no time of ease or of rest.

If I have not, when my mind is more at ease, I will endeavour to please you better.

I want to speak of Him with the same kind of ease as of the life-principle.

I refused the offers, because my Master's work was of more importance than my ease.

He was oppressed with his weariness, and he longed for peace and ease of mind to come to him.

Were not her poor friends the more sorely tried that she was dwelling at ease?

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., from Old French aise "comfort, pleasure, well-being; opportunity," of unknown origin, despite attempts to link it to various Latin verbs.

The earliest senses in French appear to be 1. "elbow-room" (from an 11th century Hebrew-French glossary) and 2. "opportunity." This led Sophus Bugge to suggest an origin in Vulgar Latin asa, a shortened form of Latin ansa "handle," which could be used in the figurative sense of "opportunity, occasion," as well as being a possible synonym for "elbow," because Latin ansatus "furnished with handles" also was used to mean "having the arms akimbo." OED editors report this theory, and write, "This is not very satisfactory, but it does not appear that any equally plausible alternative has yet been proposed."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EASE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.