Antonyms for hold

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HOLD

If you can't skin yourself you can hold a leg while somebody else skins.

You know what you hold, and if 'tain't a hand to lay down, it must be a hand to raise on.

When the Kings were weak the nobles often managed to get hold of the State.

They were good fighters and for a long time they were able to hold their own against all invaders.

I have known Harriet for many years, and I hold her in my high esteem.

The vessel might hold together till morning, but who could tell?

There's a report to-day that —— cannot hold out much longer.

Hold thyself in readiness to come down upon the first summons.

It was a very old man who held, or tried to hold, Andrew from falling to the floor.

When you see them, you will observe how he endeavours to hold me to this correspondence.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English haldan (Anglian), healdan (West Saxon), "to contain, grasp; retain; foster, cherish," class VII strong verb (past tense heold, past participle healden), from Proto-Germanic *haldanan (cf. Old Saxon haldan, Old Frisian halda, Old Norse halda, Dutch houden, German halten "to hold," Gothic haldan "to tend"), originally "to keep, tend, watch over" (as cattle), later "to have." Ancestral sense is preserved in behold. The original past participle holden was replaced by held beginning 16c., but survives in some legal jargon and in beholden.

Hold back is 1530s, transitive; 1570s, intransitive; hold off is early 15c., transitive; c.1600, intransitive; hold out is 1520s as "to stretch forth," 1580s as "to resist pressure." Hold on is early 13c. as "to maintain one’s course," 1830 as "to keep one’s grip on something," 1846 as an order to wait or stop. To hold (one's) tongue "be silent" is from c.1300. To hold (one's) own is from early 14c. To hold (someone's) hand "give moral support" is from 1935. Phrase hold your horses "be patient" is from 1844. To have and to hold have been paired alliteratively since at least c.1200, originally of marriage but also of real estate.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HOLD

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.