Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIND

Unfortunately, it does not bind me more than I am bound; but it binds you, Rosa, you.

Well, then, be it so; but loving me does not bind you too much.

Bind me over again to my good behaviour you may, by a single word.

The people who matter to us are the people who rest us—and calm us—and bind up our wounds.

We cannot break the links which bind the individual to the race.

That message, and the wearing of the rings, are all that now bind me and the Queen of Ruritania.

Of which the former are differences that bind, and the latter that separate.

Now that she did meet him she discovered that he held no bonds with which to bind her.

In other words, you bind for the sake of loosening, when a good bait is on the hook, do you not?

For the fetters which bind us can not be shaken off, before the conscience is emancipated.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bindan "to tie up with bonds" (literally and figuratively), also "to make captive; to cover with dressings and bandages" (class III strong verb; past tense band, past participle bunden), from Proto-Germanic *bindan (cf. Old Saxon bindan, Old Norse and Old Frisian binda, Old High German binten "to bind," German binden, Gothic bindan), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind" (see bend). Intransitive sense of "stick together" is from 1670s. Of books, from c.1400.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BIND

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.