Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LACE

She pretended to be a cleaner and mender of lace, but she sold a good many other things.

She was paying minute attention to the lace insertion of her skirt.

On closing the door after her the lace bed-curtains had probably caught fire.

Jennie shook out the lace fringes of her parasol; and smoothed them with some precision.

I could see nothing but the pattern of the Brussels lace as she drew back.

She dropped the lace in her basket and began to fold the garment.

I am, as you know, a smuggler; and I must send this lace on shore.

Well, old-timer, you put airing your lace curtains a little?

Madame Goujet had gone to sit by the window and work on her lace.

All the money you earn goes to buy a blue coat, and daub it with lace.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., laz, "cord made of braided or interwoven strands of silk, etc.," from Old French laz "a net, noose, string, cord, snare" (Modern French lacs), from Vulgar Latin *lacium, from Latin laqueum (nominative laqueus) "noose, snare" (Italian laccio, Spanish lazo), a trapping and hunting term, probably from Italic base *laq- "to ensnare" (cf. Latin lacere "to entice"). Later also "net, noose, snare" (c.1300); "piece of cord used to draw together the edges of slits or openings in an article of clothing" (late 14c.). The "ornamental net pattern" meaning is first recorded 1550s. Sense of "cord for tying" remains in shoelace. As an adjective, lace-curtain "middle class" (or lower-class with middle-class pretensions) usually is used in reference to Irish-Americans, by 1928.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LACE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.