Synonyms for spike

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Antonyms for spike

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SPIKE

"I have been a very wicked man, I fear," said Spike, earnestly.

In the midst of one of these revolting paroxysms Spike breathed his last.

Spike had a conscience that had become hard as iron by means of trade.

Why did Capt. Spike abandon you, Jack; you have never told me that.

But Spike neglected no precaution that experience or skill could suggest.

Both believed that they might follow wherever Spike dared to lead.

Biddy arose from her knees, just as Spike withdrew his eyes from his pursuers.

"There's the man I've picked," announced Tom, pointing to Spike.

We figured the babies to come in about three months—right, Spike?

What if the Spike Horns of the year before had no more horns?

WORD ORIGIN

"large nail," mid-14c., perhaps from Old Norse spik "splinter" (related to Old English spicing "large nail"), from Proto-Germanic *spikaz (cf. Middle Dutch spicher, Dutch spijker "nail," Old English spaca, Old High German speihha "spoke"), from PIE root *spei- "sharp point" (cf. Latin spica "ear of corn," spina "thorn, prickle, backbone," and perhaps pinna "pin" (see pin (n.)); Greek spilas "rock, cliff;" Lettish spile "wooden fork;" Lithuanian speigliai "thorns," spitna "tongue of a buckle," Old English spitu "spit").

But based on gender difficulties in the Germanic words, OED casts doubt on this whole derivation and says the English word may be a borrowing of Latin spica (see spike (n.2)), from the same root. Slang meaning "needle" is from 1923. Meaning "pointed stud in athletic shoes" is from 1832. Electrical sense of "pulse of short duration" is from 1935.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SPIKE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.