Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TIE

Strong as is the tie of interest, it has been often found ineffectual.

She called for Eileen, told her to tie on her sunshade and be ready for a short ride.

"Better slip back there and tie him, and land the ship," he says.

As an honest man, it was for him to judge if he had the right of cutting the tie there and for ever.

You must get hold of Bwana Nyele, and you must tie him fast also, and keep him from his safari.

When she was dead, might not a tie, between the uncle and nephew, be snapped asunder?

Put it warm into glass jars, and tie it up with brandy paper.

When they are cold, tie up the jar; covering the cork with leather.

Then put the whole into jars, and when cool cover and tie them up closely.

Pour in the pudding, and tie it tightly, leaving room for it to swell.

WORD ORIGIN

"that with which anything is tied," Old English teag, from Proto-Germanic *taugo (cf. Old Norse taug "tie," tygill "string"), from PIE *deuk- "to pull, to lead" (cf. Old English teon "to draw, pull, drag;" see duke (n.)).

Figurative sense is recorded from 1550s. Meaning "equality between competitors" is first found 1670s, from notion of a connecting link (tie-breaker is recorded from 1961). Sense of "necktie, cravat" first recorded 1761. The railway sense of "transverse sleeper" is from 1857, American English.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TIE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.