Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WED

Why should I guard it longer for him who may wed her, and whom I may never behold?

I have ever said that a brave lance should wed her; and, by my soul!

So Norss and Faia were wed, and they went to live in the cabin in the fir-grove.

"The mountain shall not wed the sea," muttered the envious air.

Yes, it must be a dream, since certainly it was to no madman that I was wed last night.

I think I understand you;—and they who are to be wed are happy?

I can wed them here myself—it would be the surer way—yes, that is what I shall do.

"Professor Maxon intends to wed one of these to his daughter," von Horn continued.

I have no mind to wed for a while, but Giles Martin of Gommatch is my sweetheart.

We will inveigle ladies fair, and wed them in our secret cavern.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English weddian "to pledge, covenant to do something, marry," from Proto-Germanic *wadjojanan (cf. Old Norse veðja "to bet, wager," Old Frisian weddia "to promise," Gothic ga-wadjon "to betroth"), from PIE root *wadh- "to pledge, to redeem a pledge" (cf. Latin vas, genitive vadis "bail, security," Lithuanian vaduoti "to redeem a pledge"). Sense remained "pledge" in other Germanic languages (cf. German Wette "bet, wager"); development to "marry" is unique to English. "Originally 'make a woman one's wife by giving a pledge or earnest money', then used of either party" [Buck]. Related: Wedded; wedding.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WED

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.