liaison

[ lee-ey-zawn, lee-uh-zon, -zuh n or, often, ley-; lee-ey-zuh n, -zon; French lye-zawn ]SEE DEFINITION OF liaison
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LIAISON

The offspring of a liaison between a bald head and a bank account.

His son, who was then at Court with him, was, upon the pretext of a liaison with Mdlle.

A liaison between her and Flory led to the ruin of the latter on the Stock Exchange.

He speaks of “the liaison” with all the rude simplicity and frankness of the Arabian Nights.

The first-class citizens who owned the plants had their own liaison.

And I knew his attitude toward the sort of liaison we both despised.

The liaison officer had come with them thus far, and was looking at his watch.

Would not a liaison be better than that—a liaison, and a son he could adopt?

What there was rare and excellent in the liaison came from you.

The idea of breaking off his liaison with the Marquise never had entered his mind.

WORD ORIGIN

1640s, from French liaison "a union, a binding together" (13c.), from Late Latin ligationem (nominative ligatio) "a binding," from past participle stem of Latin ligare "to bind" (see ligament). Originally a cookery term for a thickening agent for sauces. Sense of "intimate relations" is from 1806. Military sense of "cooperation between branches, allies, etc." is from 1816. The noun meaning "one who is concerned with liaison of units, etc." is short for liaison officer.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LIAISON

affair

nounillicit sexual relationship
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.