Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLASTER

After it has swollen as much as it will, the plaster mould is made as before.

The minute they find out you're Irish, they'll plaster you with praise.

If Enoch had not held his arm he would have torn off the plaster from his breast.

But the marble statues they put into a kiln to make lime to plaster their houses.

In that way they have made a plaster cast just the shape of the hole.

The Veaseys had always meant to plaster, but that consummation was still afar.

He's gone to bed, and missis is putting him a plaster on his chest.

A man in bed, with a plaster on his chest, was not likely to invite company to supper.

They mixes up alum, and bone-dust, and plaster of Paris, and—Drat that door!

Your share of that, Peter, will buy salve and plaster for your cut.'

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English plaster "medicinal application," from Vulgar Latin plastrum, shortened from Latin emplastrum "a plaster" (in the medical as well as the building sense), from Greek emplastron "salve, plaster" (used by Galen instead of more usual emplaston), noun use of neuter of emplastos "daubed on," from en- "on" + plastos "molded," from plassein "to mold" (see plasma). The building construction material is first recorded in English c.1300, via Old French plastre, from the same source, and in early use the English word often had the French spelling.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PLASTER

bandage

nouncovering for wound
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.