Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OPEN

It was still daylight, and the door of the next dwelling was open.

However, be that as it might, not one of them but knew how to open the sluices.

She arose, and would have gone around the table to him, but he met her with open arms.

The battle was disastrous for the Egyptians and the valley of the Nile was open to the invaders.

The hunters were roving the open, and even Hal Dozier was at fault.

Even if he could find an open window, or if the door were unlatched, how could he find the girl?

Running to the door she threw it open and listened intently.

He turned sharply and sauntered toward the open door of the house.

The troops moved in as good line as troops could move, at open files.

Could this be all the obstruction I was prepared to open a pass through?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English open "not closed down, raised up" (of gates, eyelids, etc.), also "exposed, evident, well-known, public," often in a bad sense, "notorious, shameless;" from Proto-Germanic *upana, literally "put or set up" (cf. Old Norse opinn, Swedish öppen, Danish aaben, Old Saxon opan, Old Frisian epen, Old High German offan, German offen "open"), from PIE *upo "up from under, over" (cf. Latin sub, Greek hypo; see sub-). Related to up, and throughout Germanic the word has the appearance of a past participle of *up (v.), but no such verb has been found. The source of words for "open" in many Indo-European languages seems to be an opposite of the word for "closed, shut" (e.g. Gothic uslukan).

Of physical spaces, "unobstructed, unencumbered," c.1200; of rooms with unclosed entrances, c.1300; of wounds, late 14c. Transferred sense of "frank, candid" is attested from early 14c. Of shops, etc., "available for business," it dates from 1824. Open-handed "liberal, generous" is from c.1600. Open door in reference to international trading policies is attested from 1856. Open season is first recorded 1896, of game; and figuratively 1914 of persons. Open book in the figurative sense of "person easy to understand" is from 1853. Open house "hospitality for all visitors" is first recorded 1824. Open-and-shut "simple, straightforward" first recorded 1841 in New Orleans. Open marriage, one in which the partners sleep with whomever they please, is from 1972. Open road (1817, American English) originally meant a public one; romanticized sense of "traveling as an expression of personal freedom" first recorded 1856, in Whitman.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OPEN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.