Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLOOM

There the flush and bloom of newness were oppressive to the right-minded.

"No, it's bloom," hastened Cornelia, covertly wiping it off.

There, all the bloom and freshness natural to youth seemed blasted!

Explications with Betty would brush the bloom off everything.

It is the only ground in the world where Ideas can germinate and bloom.

But I wad sing on wanton wing, When youthfu' May its bloom renew'd.

Her prettiness, indeed, was chiefly in slender plumpness and bloom.

Some will bloom the second season, the rest will require another year.

Any one of the following reasons may cause it to be barren of bloom.

This gives them the needed semi-rest to enable them to get ready for bloom again.

WORD ORIGIN

"blossom of a plant," c.1200, a northern word, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse blomi "flower, blossom," also collectively "flowers and foliage on trees;" from Proto-Germanic *blomon (cf. Old Saxon blomo, Middle Dutch bloeme, Dutch bloem, Old High German bluomo, German Blume, Gothic bloma), from PIE *bhle- (cf. Old Irish blath "blossom, flower," Latin flos "flower," florere "to blossom, flourish"), extended form of *bhel- (2) "to blow, inflate, swell" (see bole). Related to Old English blowan "to flower" (see blow (v.2)).

Transferred sense, of persons, is from c.1300; meaning "state of greatest loveliness" is from early 14c.; that of "blush on the cheeks" is from 1752. Old English had cognate bloma, but only in the figurative sense of "state of greatest beauty;" the main word in Old English for "flower" was blostm (see blossom).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BLOOM

beauties

nounphysical attractiveness
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.