progress

[ noun prog-res, -ruhs or, esp. British, proh-gres; verb pruh-gres ]SEE DEFINITION OF progress
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROGRESS

If one were not a scientist one might be tempted to say there is no progress.

Prehistoric man, as I just told you, was on a fair way to progress.

From this point the progress will be best narrated by extracts from my Diary.

We talked of progress; but progress, like the philosopher's stone, could not be easily attained.

From this strength we have contributed to the recovery and progress of the world.

Progress may be slow—measured in inches and feet, not miles—but we will progress.

In no nation are the institutions of progress more advanced.

We do not dread, rather do we welcome, their progress in education and industry.

Start on this journey of progress and justice, and America will walk at your side.

It was characterized as "a policy of which peace, progress and retrenchment were the watchwords."

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "a going on, action of walking forward," from Old French progres (Modern French progrès), from Latin progressus "a going forward," from past participle of progredi (see progression).

In early use in English especially "a state journey by royalty." Figurative sense of "growth, development, advancement to higher stages" is from c.1600. To be in progress "underway" is attested by 1849. Progress report attested by 1865.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PROGRESS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.