Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOVE

She looked up at him with an amused little smile, but did not move.

As it was just dark we thought it best to move on a few miles, which we did after dark.

But as Philip obeyed her words, he saw her move suddenly and stand by Emilia's side.

And a power outside his own will made Andrew move his hand to meet it.

He tried every means of whiling away the time, but it never had seemed to move so slow.

But, though his host suggested this, Andrew refused to move his blankets.

Thus the fortress must be taken before a gun or a waggon could move.

All the despair in Dick's face, though it wrung his heart, could not move him.

We shall have to employ two men to move the heavy furniture.

That's why he pulled up his hoss and waited for Allister to make the first move for his gun.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., from Anglo-French mover, Old French movoir "to move, get moving, set out; set in motion; introduce" (Modern French mouvoir), from Latin movere "move, set in motion; remove; disturb" (past participle motus, frequentative motare), from PIE root *meue- "to push away" (cf. Sanskrit kama-muta "moved by love" and probably mivati "pushes, moves;" Lithuanian mauti "push on;" Greek ameusasthai "to surpass," amyno "push away").

Intransitive sense developed in Old French and came thence to English, though it now is rare in French. Meaning "to affect with emotion" is from c.1300; that of "to prompt or impel toward some action" is from late 14c. Sense of "to change one's place of residence" is from 1707. Meaning "to propose (something) in an assembly, etc.," is first attested mid-15c. Related: Moved; moving.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.