Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SWAM

Some of them tried it, but the Indians swam after them, stabbing and pulling them under.

No, Grandad, for when we thought we had it sure, it jumped into the water and swam away.

No sooner was it apparent that she was free than the Dyaks sprang into the water and swam to her side.

Then he drew himself upon his plank and swam, doubling his speed.

A sickening vision of that first night in Paris swam before her.

He sprang into the water and swam after it, deaf to the sharp cries of Grey Beaver to return.

Rivers and streams that entered the main river he forded or swam.

And since the cat could not swim, the dog took her on his back and swam across with her.

He swam part of the time and ran and barked on the towpath the other part.

Swam until he was tired, and finally made a morsel for a fish.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English swimman "to move in or on the water, float" (class III strong verb; past tense swamm, past participle swummen), from Proto-Germanic *swemjanan (cf. Old Saxon and Old High German swimman, Old Norse svimma, Dutch zwemmen, German schwimmen), from PIE root *swem- "to be in motion."

The root is sometimes said to be restricted to Germanic, but possible cognates are Welsh chwyf "motion," Old Irish do-sennaim "I hunt," Lithuanian sundyti "to chase." For the usual Indo-European word, see natatorium. Sense of "reel or move unsteadily" first recorded 1670s; of the head or brain, from 1702. Figurative phrase sink or swim is attested from mid-15c., often with reference to ordeals of suspected witches.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.