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blow

[ bloh ]SEE DEFINITION OF blow

Synonyms for blow

  • hurricane
  • draft
  • flurry
  • gale
  • gust
  • puff
  • squall
  • tempest
  • typhoon
  • strong breeze
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for blow

  • calm
  • good fortune
  • luck
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLOW

Blow it,” he said, taking off the chain, “my mouth is too full of slime.

The blow was a bit too severe and the Egyptian fell down dead.

And you seized his cane in a fury, and broke it in returning the blow.

He rose with the blow; all his energy, from wrist to instep, was in that lifting drive.

The blow had fallen, even that which Lecorbeau had most dreaded.

To me, at least, the blow is easier to bear when I know that His beloved hand didn't strike it.

And yet it was a coward's blow, and one to stir the blood and loose the tongue of the most peaceful.

Then, he smote his thigh with a blow strong enough to kill an ox.

Men in his condition were apt to be as quick with a blow as with a caress.

It was the first time he had ever felt the cut of a whip, and the blow was not forgiven.

WORD ORIGIN

"move air," Old English blawan "blow, breathe, make an air current; kindle; inflate; sound a wind instrument" (class VII strong verb; past tense bleow, past participle blawen), from Proto-Germanic *blæ-anan (cf. Old High German blaen, German blähen), from PIE *bhle- "to swell, blow up" (cf. Latin flare "to blow"), possibly identical with *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell" (see bole).

Meaning "to squander" (of money) is from 1874. Sense of "depart suddenly" is from 1902. Slang "do fellatio on" sense is from 1933, as blow (someone) off, originally among prostitutes (cf. blow job). This usage probably is not connected to the colloquial imprecation (1781, associated with sailors, e.g. Popeye's "well, blow me down!"), which has past participle blowed. Meaning "to spend (money) foolishly and all at once" is 1890s; that of "bungle an opportunity" is from 1943. To blow over "pass" is from 1610s, originally of storms. To blow (someone's) mind was in use by 1967; there is a song title "Blow Your Mind" released in a 1965 Mirawood recording by a group called The Gas Company.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BLOW

accident

noununexpected, undesirable event; often physically injurious

bad luck

nounrotten break

bang

nounloud hit or knock
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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