Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SHAKE

Grace caught Emma by the shoulders and proceeded to shake her.

Hey, Scottie, shake up the fire and put on some coffee, will you?

She clung to appearances with a tenacity that nothing could shake.

"Remember, sir, you are an honest man; you cannot shake hands with me," said George.

He made an effort to shake off the feeling, and spoke with a sneer.

"It is well," said he, and with a shake of the bridle rode on down the woodland path.

Come, my daughter, shake hands with this gentleman, and pledge him your troth.

He stopped a moment, tapping the frame with his fingers to shake off the dust.

The circumstances of war contain every element that can shake the nerves.

They pressed forward to shake the hands of this strange couple.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sceacan "move (something) quickly to and fro, brandish; move the body or a part of it rapidly back and forth;" also "go, glide, hasten, flee, depart" (cf. sceacdom "flight"); of persons or parts of the body, "to tremble" especially from fever, cold, fear" (class VI strong verb; past tense scoc, past participle scacen), from Proto-Germanic *skakanan (cf. Old Norse, Swedish skaka, Danish skage "to shift, turn, veer"). No certain cognates outside Germanic, but some suggest a possible connection to Sanskrit khaj "to agitate, churn, stir about," Old Church Slavonic skoku "a leap, bound," Welsh ysgogi "move."

Of the earth in earthquakes, c.1300. Meaning "seize and shake (someone or something else)" is from early 14c. In reference to mixing ingredients, etc., by shaking a container from late 14c. Meaning "to rid oneself of by abrupt twists" is from c.1200, also in Middle English in reference to evading responsibility, etc. Meaning "weaken, impair" is from late 14c., on notion of "make unstable."

To shake hands dates from 1530s. Shake a (loose) leg "hurry up" first recorded 1904; shake a heel (sometimes foot) was an old way to say "to dance" (1660s); to shake (one's) elbow (1620s) meant "to gamble at dice." Phrase more _____ than you can shake a stick at is attested from 1818, American English. To shake (one's) head as a sign of disapproval is recorded from c.1300.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SHAKE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.