Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SHOCK

Even Hope's strong constitution felt the shock of this adventure.

She had a shock every time she came in and found it still there.

And with his head still turned, Andrew felt a shock and flounder.

One purpose of this introduction is to prepare the reader for such a shock.

In growth all is adjusted to capacity; it is not meant to shock, force, or frighten.

She had not life enough left to resist the shock of her father-in-law's blows.

The shock, we are told, brought on a paralytic seizure of which he died.

A sudden throb of shock masked in the surface indifference of intonation.

It was only that her faith in him had had a shock and was slow of reviving.

Wilson was breathing quietly: his color was coming up, as he rallied from the shock.

WORD ORIGIN

1560s, "violent encounter of armed forces or a pair of warriors," a military term, from Middle French choc "violent attack," from Old French choquer "strike against," probably from Frankish, from a Proto-Germanic imitative base (cf. Middle Dutch schokken "to push, jolt," Old High German scoc "jolt, swing").

Meaning "a sudden blow" is from 1610s; meaning "a sudden and disturbing impression on the mind" is from 1705. Sense of "feeling of being (mentally) shocked" is from 1876. Medical sense is attested from 1804 (it also once meant "seizure, stroke," 1794). Shock-absorber is attested from 1906 (short form shocks attested by 1961); shock wave is from 1907. Shock troops (1917) translates German stoßtruppen and preserves the word's original military sense. Shock therapy is from 1917; shock treatment from 1938.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SHOCK

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.