synonyms
  • definitions

confound

[ kon-found, kuhn-; for 6 usually kon-found ]SEE DEFINITION OF confound

Synonyms for confound

  • amaze
  • astonish
  • astound
  • baffle
  • bewilder
  • discombobulate
  • dumbfound
  • embarrass
  • faze
  • mystify
  • perplex
  • puzzle
  • rattle
  • startle
  • surprise
  • abash
  • befog
  • blend
  • bug
  • commingle
  • confute
  • discomfit
  • discountenance
  • fiddle
  • flabbergast
  • jumble
  • misidentify
  • mix
  • nonplus
  • pose
  • throw
  • metagrobolize
  • mix up
  • screw up
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for confound

  • bore
  • calm
  • clarify
  • clear up
  • comfort
  • enlighten
  • expect
  • explain
  • explicate
  • help
  • divide
  • separate
  • unmix
  • make clear
  • relate
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONFOUND

But no—confound it—there was some one coming down the avenue!

Besides, confound it, Tom, you could be useful to me in a hundred ways.'

Confound her, it was like her pale face to be wandering up and down the house!

It is not essential formally and absolutely to confound will with desire.

Why should I look him up, confound him—he hadn't bothered his head about me.

I rejoice in the change; but we must not confound names with things.

It's my experience that you've always got to, consider the Union, confound them!

There is no poisonous species with which one is likely to confound it.

But neither must we confound the theories or aspects of morality with the origin of our moral ideas.

But, confound it, Annette, we've been calling on those people all summer.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "make uneasy, abash," from Anglo-French confoundre, Old French confondre (12c.) "crush, ruin, disgrace, throw into disorder," from Latin confundere "to confuse," literally "to pour together, mix, mingle," from com- "together" (see com-) + fundere "to pour" (see found (v.2)).

The figurative sense of "confuse, fail to distinguish, mix up" emerged in Latin, passed into French and thence into Middle English, where it is mostly found in Scripture; the sense of "destroy utterly" is recorded in English from c.1300. Meaning "perplex" is late 14c. The Latin past participle confusus, meanwhile, became confused (q.v.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONFOUND

addle

verbconfuse
  • baffle
  • befuddle
  • bewilder
  • confound
  • discombobulate
  • disconcert
  • fuddle
  • mix up
  • muddle
  • muddy
  • mystify
  • perplex
  • puzzle

astonish

verbsurprise
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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