admiration

[ ad-muh-rey-shuhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF admiration
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ADMIRATION

This so excited the admiration of Speusippus, that a love of philosophy was kindled within him.

This Niebuhr, who was a surveyor by profession, was a young man who deserves our admiration.

Then he licked his chops and looked in admiration on his worldly friend.

She had a fondness and admiration for this child and her audacity.

He seemed to have no inordinate desire for admiration or even for approbation.

The first picture that attracted our admiration was a "Sheep scene," by Lambdin.

One loving look from human eyes was more to her than the admiration of the world!

As he hurried to the door, he expressed again his admiration for the name.

The winning of a battle is not enough to engage all our admiration; it must be won by an artist.

She had been vexed by Ned's admiration for me; and yet—and yet she didn't understand.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "wonder," from Middle French admiration (14c.) or directly from Latin admirationem (nominative admiratio) "a wondering at, admiration," noun of state from past participle stem of admirari "admire," from ad- "at" (see ad-) + mirari "to wonder," from mirus "wonderful" (see miracle). The sense has weakened steadily since 16c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ADMIRATION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.