Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WONDERS

But Babylon was made into one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

Side by side with the wonders he described so casually, she was placing the little house.

The melons are excellent; the omelets are wonders, and the salads something to be remembered.

But even as it is to-day, that ghost of a city is among the world's wonders.

If he were the seventh son of a seventh son, he was himself a wonder of wonders.

And all of us have like wonders hidden in our breasts, only needing circumstances to evoke them.

It is at the price of lives such as these that the wonders of civilisation are achieved.

But the wonders of the universe held a new beauty now for Carr.

In front of each house was a small square with—wonder of wonders!

Indeed, what are these wonders as compared with those of the City of Love?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wundor "marvelous thing, marvel, the object of astonishment," from Proto-Germanic *wundran (cf. Old Saxon wundar, Middle Dutch, Dutch wonder, Old High German wuntar, German wunder, Old Norse undr), of unknown origin. In Middle English it also came to mean the emotion associated with such a sight (late 13c.). The verb is from Old English wundrian. Used colloquially in Pennsylvania German areas in some transitive senses (It wonders me that ... for "I wonder why ..."); this was common in Middle English and as late as Tindale (1533), and a correspondent reports the usage also yet survives in Yorkshire/Lincolnshire. Related: Wondered, wondering, wonders.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.