Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR KNOW

You know that Milbrey girl must get her effrontery direct from where they make it.

Without reasons I was sure of, you know, so there could be no chance of any mistake.

Don't mind him, dad—I know all about it, I tell you—I'll explain later to you.

It's the Viluca—Mr. Bines, you know; he's bringing his sister back to me.

I know that I have spoken of him as I ought not to have spoken.

I know, better than you possibly can, what reasons I have to trust the strength of his affection.

I know it all by heart—all the things to say to a man on the downward path.

He is a countryman of mine; and I know he is as avaricious as an Odomantian.

You can just as well get into the hundred million class as not, and I know it.

Then they won't always be askin' who your pa was—they'll be wantin' to know who you are, by Gripes!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English cnawan (class VII strong verb; past tense cneow, past participle cnawen), "to know, perceive; acknowledge, declare," from Proto-Germanic *knew- (cf. Old High German bi-chnaan, ir-chnaan "to know"), from PIE root *gno- "to know" (cf. Old Persian xšnasatiy "he shall know;" Old Church Slavonic znati, Russian znat "to know;" Latin gnoscere; Greek *gno-, as in gignoskein; Sanskrit jna- "know"). Once widespread in Germanic, this form is now retained only in English, where however it has widespread application, covering meanings that require two or more verbs in other languages (e.g. German wissen, kennen, erkennen and in part können; French connaître, savoir; Latin novisse, cognoscere; Old Church Slavonic znaja, vemi). The Anglo-Saxons used two distinct words for this, witan (see wit) and cnawan.

Meaning "to have sexual intercourse with" is attested from c.1200, from the Old Testament. To not know one's ass from one's elbow is from 1930. To know better "to have learned from experience" is from 1704. You know as a parenthetical filler is from 1712, but it has roots in 14c. To know too much (to be allowed to live, escape, etc.) is from 1872. As an expression of surprise, what do you know attested by 1914.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR KNOW

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.