Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SENSE

"Well, I'm glad you got some sense," answered the old man, grudgingly.

He distrusted his eyes, his ears, and every sense that he possessed.

We sense the call of the human heart for fellowship, fraternity, and cooperation.

He had to sense the coming of danger before it showed its face.

The intention is, I tell you plainly, to mortify you into a sense of your duty.

A President may sense and proclaim that new spirit, but only a people can provide it.

If she had said, "Pretty Annie," there would have been some sense in it.

She had a woman's sense of humour, which is not always urbane.

She couldn't get over her sense of his parenthood, his authority.

They even stared as though she had said something that had no sense in it.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1400, "faculty of perception," also "meaning, import, interpretation" (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens "one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding" (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus "perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning," from sentire "perceive, feel, know," probably a figurative use of a literally meaning "to find one's way," or "to go mentally," from PIE root *sent- "to go" (cf. Old High German sinnan "to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive," German Sinn "sense, mind," Old English sið "way, journey," Old Irish set, Welsh hynt "way"). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.

Meaning "that which is wise" is from c.1600. Meaning "capacity for perception and appreciation" is from c.1600 (e.g. Sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SENSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.