Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LEARN

They were never allowed to learn any liberal art, or to sing manly songs.

I think, on the whole, I shan't be obliged to learn to braid straw.

If the worst came, he could go West with the family and learn how to do something.

"If you will consult the captain, you may learn your mistake," said Robert.

Government must learn to take less from people so that people can do more for themselves.

By the way, what inducements could a swift writer as he have to learn short-hand!

As far as we can learn there never was an emergency yet which the life-principle was not equipped to meet.

It takes a lifetime, Mr. Vavasor, to learn where to pay our taxes.

We learn nothing, we take no forward step, except as we are whipped to it by anguish.

The only way to learn the rules of any thing practical is to begin to do the thing.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English leornian "to get knowledge, be cultivated, study, read, think about," from Proto-Germanic *liznojan (cf. Old Frisian lernia, Middle Dutch leeren, Dutch leren, Old High German lernen, German lernen "to learn," Gothic lais "I know"), with a base sense of "to follow or find the track," from PIE *leis- "track." Related to German Gleis "track," and to Old English læst "sole of the foot" (see last (n.)).

The transitive sense (He learned me how to read), now vulgar, was acceptable from c.1200 until early 19c., from Old English læran "to teach" (cf. Dutch leren, German lehren "to teach," literally "to make known;" see lore), and is preserved in past participle adjective learned "having knowledge gained by study." Related: Learning.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LEARN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.