Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCHOOL

“Thou art a big fellow for a school,” said his uncle, looking him over.

She had boasted to him once of having learned to smoke at school.

The school was under the head-mastership of "the terrific Dr. Keate."

The moral discipline of the school was also called in question.

Small boys and girls, returning from school, were beginning to play.

He was the head of the school when I, the elder, was a lout in the lower fourth.

In painting, we believe we possess a school second to none of modern art.

This was my position on the plantation a short time after school was out for the term.

During the time I attended my young mistresses to school, sir.

Giggleswick is also the proud possessor of a school founded in 1512.

WORD ORIGIN

"place of instruction," Old English scol, from Latin schola "intermission of work, leisure for learning; learned conversation, debate; lecture; meeting place for teachers and students, place of instruction; disciples of a teacher, body of followers, sect," from Greek skhole "spare time, leisure, rest ease; idleness; that in which leisure is employed; learned discussion;" also "a place for lectures, school;" originally "a holding back, a keeping clear," from skhein "to get" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold, hold in one's power, to have;" see scheme (n.)) + -ole by analogy with bole "a throw," stole "outfit," etc.

The original notion is "leisure," which passed to "otiose discussion" (in Athens or Rome the favorite or proper use for free time), then "place for such discussion." The Latin word was widely borrowed, cf. Old French escole, French école, Spanish escuela, Italian scuola, Old High German scuola, German Schule, Swedish skola, Gaelic sgiol, Welsh ysgol, Russian shkola. Translated in Old English as larhus, literally "lore house," but this seems to have been a glossary word only.

Meaning "students attending a school" in English is attested from c.1300; sense of "school building" is first recorded 1590s. Sense of "people united by a general similarity of principles and methods" is from 1610s; hence school of thought (1864). School of hard knocks "rough experience in life" is recorded from 1912 (in George Ade); to tell tales out of school "betray damaging secrets" is from 1540s. School bus is from 1908. School days is from 1590s. School board from 1870.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCHOOL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.