Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STAMP

This operation is performed by a female, with the aid of a stamp.

Dare you to wear your brother's coat without the crescent which should stamp you as his cadet.

He really understood how to sugar-coat poison as well as any man of his stamp could.

When I reached his side, the stamp of death was on his face.

You acted like a hero in trying to shield Alan Porter, and I like men of that stamp.

It was a good dime, and bore the stamp of the best and greatest nation on the earth.

We stamp our feet to warm them, and dead citizens arise in heavy clouds.

Bit by bit he'll stamp his own character into hers—because she loves him.

At Jocelyn's Rock the stamp of age was upon every decoration, on every ornament.

You have nothing to lose but the stamp to answer this announcement.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stempan "to pound in a mortar, stamp," from Proto-Germanic *stampojanan (cf. Old Norse stappa, Middle Dutch stampen, Old High German stampfon, German stampfen "to stamp with the foot, beat, pound," German Stampfe "pestle"), from nasalized form of PIE root *stebh- "to support, place firmly on" (cf. Greek stembein "to trample, misuse;" see staff (n.)). The meaning "impress or mark (something) with a die" is first recorded 1560.

Related: Stamped; stamping. To stamp out "extinguish (a fire) by stamping on it" is attested from 1851 in the figurative sense. Stamping ground "one's particular territory" (1821) is from the notion of animals. Italian stampa "stamp, impression," Spanish estampar "to stamp, print," French estamper "to stamp, impress" are Germanic loan-words.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STAMP

appearance

nounoutward aspect, characteristic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.