Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GRAVE

“I mean a man sad and grave as the monks of Beaulieu,” said the jester.

Then he set to work and made himself a grave which was to endure for all time.

Excuse me, my dear friend, for these grave soliloquies, as I may call them.

See what grave reflections an innocent subject will produce!

What way will I live and the girls with me, and I an old woman looking for the grave?

Alas, the vanity of mortal projects, even when they centre in the grave!

But every body else was there, so we did not miss these grave and reverend seigniors.

Mary regarded the owner of the store with grave questioning in her violet eyes.

I should not rest quiet in the grave, coz, if I had not another turn at them.

"Don't worry about the boy," he said, with grave kindliness.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English græf "grave, ditch, cave," from Proto-Germanic *graban (cf. Old Saxon graf, Old Frisian gref, Old High German grab "grave, tomb;" Old Norse gröf "cave," Gothic graba "ditch"), from PIE root *ghrebh- "to dig, to scratch, to scrape" (cf. Old Church Slavonic grobu "grave, tomb"); related to grafan "to dig" (see grave (v.)).

From Middle Ages to 17c., they were temporary, crudely marked repositories from which the bones were removed to ossuaries after some years and the grave used for a fresh burial. "Perpetual graves" became common from c.1650. To make (someone) turn in his grave "behave in some way that would have offended the dead person" is first recorded 1888.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GRAVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.