astringent

[ uh-strin-juhnt ]SEE DEFINITION OF astringent

Synonyms for astringent

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Antonyms for astringent

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ASTRINGENT

The wood is of an astringent nature, and if put into vinegar makes it stronger.

As this is an astringent, the doses must be proportioned accordingly, and the mixture is wholesome only while it remains sweet.

Hard water possesses an astringent quality, which prevents the goodness of the malt from being freely communicated to the liquor.

After the harsh, astringent drug, the flavour was soothing and gratifying.

Both root and flower are astringent and are given for dysentery.

The fruit is astringent and is used in Java as an injection for gonorrhœa.

The flowers are astringent and are used in infusion in cases of diarrhœa.

It is used for building purposes and, in medicine, as an astringent.

This preparation is also used in astringent gargles and injections.

When the skin is pale, lax, and wrinkled, astringent washes may be used.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, from Latin astringentum (nominative astringens), present participle of astringere "to bind fast, tighten, contract," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + stringere "draw tight" (see strain (v.)). As a noun from 1620s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ASTRINGENT

acidic

adjectivecontaining acid
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.