Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SUDDEN

Mrs. Van Geist fixed her niece with a sudden look of suspicion.

Once it was that he had felt a sudden great longing for the life of a gay city.

He seemed to make a strong effort to check some sudden impulse.

I might have paid them at the time, but it was all so unexpected and so sudden,—it rattled me, quite.

He was not naturally bad, but he had fallen a victim to sudden temptation.

Mary Reynolds' eyes were wide with surprise and sudden hope.

Such a change of views was not the sudden impulse of an hour.

A sudden memory of words that Viviette had used the day before occurred to him.

"I didn't think it would be so sudden," she said, a little wildly.

Your sudden departure needs no other explanation to the household than this telegram.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., perhaps via Anglo-French sodein, from Old French subdain "immediate, sudden," from Vulgar Latin *subitanus, variant of Latin subitaneus "sudden," from subitus "come or go up stealthily," from sub "up to" + ire "come, go." Phrase all of a sudden first attested 1680s, earlier of a sudayn (1590s), upon the soden (1550s). Sudden death, tie-breakers in sports, first recorded 1927; earlier in reference to coin tosses (1834).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SUDDEN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.