precipitate

[ verb pri-sip-i-teyt; adjective, noun pri-sip-i-tit, -teyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF precipitate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRECIPITATE

How would she explain to herself his sudden, precipitate journey to London alone?

To Daniel, the blow was all that he needed to precipitate his ruin.

It may be that he did not want to precipitate the slaughter.

"No, no, it would but precipitate itself at once upon us," replied John.

Precipitate allowed to stand 24 hours, and then dried at 55°.

Another spasm of the creature will precipitate us into the street!

The blacker and denser the precipitate the better is the solution.

To look was one thing, to follow, to precipitate one's head into the unknown, was another.

As a parachute, it serves its purpose in a precipitate leap.

Be not precipitate, nor trust to appearances only, lest you be deceived!

WORD ORIGIN

"to hurl or fling down," 1520s, a back formation from precipitation or else from Latin praecipitatus, past participle of praecipitare "to throw or dive headlong," from praeceps "steep, headlong, headfirst" (see precipice). Meaning "to cause to happen, hurry the beginning of" is recorded from 1620s. Chemical sense is from 1620s; meteorological sense first attested 1863. Related: Precipitated; precipitating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRECIPITATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.