Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DISPATCH

I got a dispatch from, him quoting the Virago of Paris—meaning the Figaro, of course.

The dispatch was long, and he read it with a deepening frown.

If you don't get this dispatch through, you don't get anything.

He drew the dispatch from the inside pocket of his waistcoat.

His dispatch undoubtedly was of great importance, and yet he was not able to deliver it.

As it may therefore be of importance, I dispatch it with my own, by my servant, post-haste.

It was therefore necessary to dispatch a courier to Mexico, and to wait his return.

She could pick a lock too, when needed, with great neatness and dispatch.

"Wait a minute, Bond," he said as he handed me the dispatch.

The army immediately advanced with all dispatch to the swamp.

WORD ORIGIN

1510s, "to send off in a hurry," from a word in Spanish (despachar "expedite, hasten") or Italian (dispacciare "to dispatch"). For first element, see dis-. The exact source of the second element has been proposed as Vulgar Latin *pactare "to fasten, fix" or *pactiare, or as Latin -pedicare "to entrap" (from Latin pedica "shackle;" see impeach); and the Spanish and Italian words seem to be related to (perhaps opposites of) Old Provençal empachar "impede." See OED for full discussion. Meaning "to get rid of by killing" is attested from 1520s. Related: Dispatched; dispatching. As a noun, from 1540s, originally "dismissal;" sense of "a message sent speedily" is first attested 1580s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DISPATCH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.