Synonyms for catch

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Antonyms for catch

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CATCH

The first thing I am going to do is to catch some fish, if you'll lend me your boat.

She said all was cold in the church, and nothing to catch hold on there.

But every evening, towards bedtime, she came into the garden to catch Mimi.

Of the Infinite the finite mind can only catch a finite glimpse.

I catch a glimpse of the grandness of your sister's meaning.

I do not admit it even at that, just as I do not admit that if the sky fell we should all catch larks.

"You must have crooked ways to catch crooks, believe me," he said cheerfully.

Lifting myself to catch the upper scent, I winded a man that was not of Ty-uonyi.

And Otto ran away barely in time to catch the groom, who was going for the hay.

When it is full, we pour the water in it, and catch the lye as it drips out.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "to take, capture," from Anglo-French or Old North French cachier "catch, capture" (animals) (Old French chacier "hunt, pursue, drive (animals)," Modern French chasser "to hunt;" making it a doublet of chase (v.)), from Vulgar Latin *captiare "try to seize, chase" (also source of Spanish cazar, Italian cacciare), from Latin captare "to take, hold," frequentative of Latin capere "to take, hold" (see capable).

Senses in early Middle English also included "chase, hunt," which later went with chase (v.). Of infections from 1540s; of fire from 1734; of sleep, etc., from early 14c. Related: Catched (obsolete); catching; caught.

Meaning "act as a catcher in baseball" recorded from 1865. To catch on "apprehend" is 1884, American English colloquial. To catch (someone's) eye is first attested 1813, in Jane Austen. Catch as catch can first attested late 14c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CATCH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.