Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LISTENED

Her lover played upon his flute, while she leaned against a tree and listened.

Philothea had listened so earnestly, that for a moment all other thoughts were expelled from her mind.

All who listened were deeply impressed by language so mysterious.

The tune was familiar to her in happier days, and she listened to it with tears.

Eudora's countenance kindled with indignation, as she listened to what Milza had told.

While she looked at one, she listened to the other, and her neck grew tired with turning.

No one who listened to her could doubt her perfect truthfulness and integrity.

Miss Wilder listened attentively to Grace's eager outpouring.

Austin listened to her reminiscences and turned the talk to the drive.

Running to the door she threw it open and listened intently.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English hlysnan "to listen," from Proto-Germanic *khlusinon (cf. Dutch luisteren, Old High German hlosen "to listen," German lauschen "to listen"), from PIE root *kleu- "hearing, to hear" (cf. Sanskrit srnoti "hears," srosati "hears, obeys;" Avestan sraothra "ear;" Middle Persian srod "hearing, sound;" Lithuanian klausau "to hear," slove "splendor, honor;" Old Church Slavonic slusati "to hear," slava "fame, glory," slovo "word;" Greek klyo "hear, be called," kleos "report, rumor, fame glory," kleio "make famous;" Latin cluere "to hear oneself called, be spoken of;" Old Irish ro-clui-nethar "hears," clunim "I hear," clu "fame, glory," cluada "ears;" Welsh clywaf "I hear;" Old English hlud "loud," hleoðor "tone, tune;" Old High German hlut "sound;" Gothic hiluþ "listening, attention"). The -t- probably is by influence of Old English hlystan (see list (v.2)). For vowel evolution, see bury. As a noun from 1788 (on the listen "alert").

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.