Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TRICKING

Once more, Polyphme, you are tricking, you seek all sorts of evasions.

She's a brick, and I feel so guiltily aware of tricking her.

How she had played with him, tricking him, fooling him, outwitting him—and yet loving him.

He is tricking me, I do believe; and to-day too, just when I was so dull and lonely.

Or else this was their way of tricking him into talking freely.

Once outside they might have a chance of outrunning or tricking their pursuers.

Do you mean to intimate that you have been tricking me, sir?

But she knew he had suffered acutely in tricking and lying to Jimmy.

For this set of gentry are adepts in all the arts of knavery and tricking.

By tricking him into a marriage, and then by threatening him if he did not take her to his home.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "a cheat, a mean ruse," from Old North French trique "trick, deceit, treachery, cheating," from trikier "to deceive, to cheat," variant of Old French trichier, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccare, from Latin tricari "be evasive, shuffle," from tricæ "trifles, nonsense, a tangle of difficulties," of unknown origin.

Meaning "a roguish prank" is recorded from 1580s; sense of "the art of doing something" is first attested 1610s. Meaning "prostitute's client" is first attested 1915; earlier it was U.S. slang for "a robbery" (1865). Trick-or-treat is recorded from 1942.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.