Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LEAVE

Your brother was foolish enough to leave his boat in Rushton's care.

But nevertheless he could not leave it behind since it was for this he had incurred his present peril.

Then go down and leave it where you found it, and I will let you come up.

They administer stinging rebukes that leave the adversary writhing.

Halbert thought it was time to be going, and accordingly got up and took his leave.

If you will leave the matter in my hands, I will call upon him to-night, and see what I can do.

And six weeks after that I had things in shape so't I was able to leave.

He was married, but constantly said he was about to leave his wife, so she would divorce him.

He must be a cursed scoundrel to leave that poor lad there to die!

After the boats were crowded, they would hold on to them so that they could not leave the shore.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English læfan "to let remain; remain; have left; bequeath," from Proto-Germanic *laibijan (cf. Old Frisian leva "to leave," Old Saxon farlebid "left over"), causative of *liban "remain," (cf. Old English belifan, German bleiben, Gothic bileiban "to remain"), from root *laf- "remnant, what remains," from PIE *leip- "to stick, adhere;" also "fat."

The Germanic root has only the sense "remain, continue," which also is in Greek lipares "persevering, importunate." But this usually is regarded as a development from the primary PIE sense of "adhere, be sticky" (cf. Lithuanian lipti, Old Church Slavonic lipet "to adhere," Greek lipos "grease," Sanskrit rip-/lip- "to smear, adhere to." Seemingly contradictory meaning of "depart" (early 13c.) comes from notion of "to leave behind" (as in to leave the earth "to die;" to leave the field "retreat").

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LEAVE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.