Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOVES

Paralus breathes and moves, but is apparently unconscious of existence in this world.

Hannah, as she moves up and down, is shunned as a person infected.

She moves by right of beauty and high purpose, in the best society.

One who moves along the line of least reluctance to a desired death.

The second tumbril empties and moves on; the third comes up.

Let the South believe this, and prepare to obey the hand that moves their destiny.

Markest thou not the stiffness wherewith he moves his left leg!'

Now, Gilberte, is it the idea of the child that moves you so deeply?

But there is no one letter in this old packet which moves me specially.

Grey is the landscape; dim as ashes; the water murmurs and moves.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., from Anglo-French mover, Old French movoir "to move, get moving, set out; set in motion; introduce" (Modern French mouvoir), from Latin movere "move, set in motion; remove; disturb" (past participle motus, frequentative motare), from PIE root *meue- "to push away" (cf. Sanskrit kama-muta "moved by love" and probably mivati "pushes, moves;" Lithuanian mauti "push on;" Greek ameusasthai "to surpass," amyno "push away").

Intransitive sense developed in Old French and came thence to English, though it now is rare in French. Meaning "to affect with emotion" is from c.1300; that of "to prompt or impel toward some action" is from late 14c. Sense of "to change one's place of residence" is from 1707. Meaning "to propose (something) in an assembly, etc.," is first attested mid-15c. Related: Moved; moving.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.