Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BRING

He never could find out what was "going on" to bring so many folks into town.

Very well; bring me what you have at that hour, and we'll strike a trade.

He should bring an almanac with him to know when the days go by.

He wished to bring his whole heart back to her—or at least wished that he wished it.

In all these ways, I will bring the values of our history to the care of our times.

Did you bring your work, girls, or is it to be a case of idle hands?

Williams, Gunby, and Howard, all strove in vain to bring it to order.

All persons who will not join you you will take prisoners and bring to me.

If peril could bring about unity God could bring it about even more effectively.

Those who bring them on us seem captious, thoughtless, cruel.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bringan "to bring, bring forth, produce, present, offer" (past tense brohte, past participle broht), from Proto-Germanic *brenganan (cf. Old Frisian brenga, Middle Dutch brenghen, Old High German bringan, Gothic briggan); no exact cognates outside Germanic, but it appears to be from PIE root *bhrengk-, compound based on root *bher- (1) "to carry" (cf. Latin ferre; see infer).

The tendency to conjugate this as a strong verb on the model of sing, drink, etc., is ancient: Old English also had a rare strong past participle form, brungen, corresponding to modern colloquial brung. To bring down the house figuratively (1754) is to elicit applause so thunderous it collapses the roof.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BRING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.